agameofclothes:

What Lysa would have worn in her later years, Georges Hobeika

(via amortentiafashion)

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today-isawindingroad:

thewheezyviking:

impeccabletasteinmusic:

Rupert Grint | Lightning

OMG RON STOP IT WHEN DID YOU GET SUCH A GREAT VOICE UGH HOLD THE PHONE CALLING ED SHEERAN RIGHT NOW NO SERIOUSLY I DON’T HAVE ROOM FOR TWO SEXY GINGER SINGERS IN MY LIFE JK I DO THE MORE THE MERRIER

HOLY SHIT IT’S REAL….HOW THE HELL?!?!?!

http://metro.co.uk/2014/05/22/shocker-ron-weasley-can-sing-actor-rupert-grint-unveils-pop-track-lightning-4737233/ <— article about it O___O

tHIS IS HILARIOUS

(via finnickswand)

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rosefire:

gaywitch-practisingabortion:

situationalstudent:

purplespacecats:

professorbutterscotch:

kiskolee:

THIS.

I have never thought about it in this context

that’s actually really, really creepy.

I… fuck.

Yeah, basically.

I once pointed this out to my mother and she just stared at me, in stunned silence for ages. 

There will always be a girl who is less sober, less secure, with less friends walking in a darker part of town. I want her safe just as much as I want me safe.


 

(via lord--swoledemort)

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This is my perfect schedule.

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probingtheearth:

Dan Kiley

(via mosspixi)

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All seasons: I will wear all black

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Anonymous: Towards the whole "pronouns hurt people's feelings" topic. Am I REALLY the only person on the planet that thinks people are becoming far to sensative? Nearly to the point that they shouldn't leave their little home bubbles in the case that a bird chirps next to them in a way that sounds like a mean word. Maybe, JUST MAYBE, we're becoming a little TOO coddling and people need to learn to deal with simplistic shit like words. And yes, I've been insulted and made fun of. I got over it. So can you.

nonplaudite:

thefrogman:

Supposedly invented by the Chinese, there is an ancient form of torture that is nothing more than cold, tiny drops falling upon a person’s forehead. 

On its own, a single drop is nothing. It falls upon the brow making a tiny splash. It doesn’t hurt. No real harm comes from it. 

In multitudes, the drops are still fairly harmless. Other than a damp forehead, there really is no cause for concern. 

The key to the torture is being restrained. You cannot move. You must feel each drop. You have lost all control over stopping these drops of water from splashing on your forehead. 

It still doesn’t seem like that big of a deal. But person after person, time and time again—would completely unravel psychologically. They all had a breaking point where each drop turned into a horror. Building and building until all sense of sanity was completely lost. 

"It was just a joke, quit being so sensitive."

"They used the wrong pronoun, big deal."

"So your parents don’t understand, it could be worse."

Day after day. Drop after drop. It builds up. A single instance on its own is no big deal. A few drops, not a problem. But when you are restrained, when you cannot escape the drops, when it is unending—these drops can be agony. 

People aren’t sensitive because they can’t take a joke. Because they can’t take being misgendered one time. Because they lack a thick skin. 

People are sensitive because the drops are unending and they have no escape from them. 

You are only seeing the tiny, harmless, single drop hitting these so-called “sensitive” people. You are failing to see the thousands of drops endured before that. You are failing to see the restraints that make them inescapable.

Amen.

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TMI Appreciation Week  Day 4: Favorite Quote(s)  Jace’s Declarations of Love

(via feyworld)

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"

Irony can also operate through ‘silly’ neologisms. This happens routinely in the lad magazines. FHM, for example, in evaluating photographs of readers’ girlfriends’ breasts makes such comments as ‘if we’re being fussy, right chesticle is a tad larger than the left’ — the sheer silliness of the term ‘chesticle’ raising a smile so that one might almost overlook the fact that this is a competition (‘breast quest’) to find the ‘best pair of tits’ in Britain (in 2005)!

Irony also functions through the very extremeness of the sexism expressed: as though the mere fact that women are compared to ‘rusty old bangers’ or posed against each other in the ‘dumbest girlfriend’ competition is (perversely) evidence that there is no sexism. (I.e. the extremeness of the sexism is evidence that there is no sexism!) Magazine editors routinely trot out the line that it is all ‘harmless fun.’ (when did ‘harmless’ and ‘fun’ become yoked together so powerfully?) And some academic commentators agree: David Gauntlett (2002) argues that the sexism in such magazines is ‘knowingly ridiculous, based on the assumption that it’s silly to be sexist (and therefore is funny in a silly way)’ (168).

Yet if we suspend our disbelief in the notion that it’s ‘just a laugh’, we are left with a fast-growing area of media content (itself profoundly influencing other media) that is chillingly misogynist, inviting men to evaluate women only as sexual objects. A recent issue of FHM asks men: ‘how much are you paying for sex?’. Readers are invited to calculate their ‘outgoings’ on items such as drinks, cinema tickets and bunches of flowers, and then to divide the total by the number of ‘shags’ they’ve had that month in order to calculate their ‘pay per lay’. Under a fiver per shag is ‘too cheap — she is about the same price as the Cambodian whore’; around £11 to £20 is ‘about the going rate for a Cypriot tart’ and each shag should now be compared with the value and pleasure to be obtained from purchasing a new CD. Any more expensive than this and you should expect a performance worthy of a highly trained, sexy showgirl (Turner, 2005).

It’s hard to imagine any other group in society being so systematically objectified, attacked and vilified, with so little opposition — and this tells us something about the power of irony. Any attempt to offer a critique of such articles is dismissed by references to the critic’s presumed ugliness, stupidity or membership of the ‘feminist thought police’. Frequently, criticisms are pre-empted by comments which suggest that the article’s writer is expecting ‘blundering rants’ from the ‘council of women’, etc. In this context, critique becomes much more difficult — and this, it would seem, is precisely what is intended.

"

Rosalind Gill: Postfeminist media culture: elements of a sensibility

(via exgynocraticgrrl)

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shadowstep-of-bast:

carpeumbra:

No you don’t understand how frustrated I am that we always depicted the Apostles as old men, especially when it comes to during-Jesus-alive stuff.

They were probably late teens to early 20s, given the time and the description and some Biblical passages.

They were not ancient old men with long ass beards and wrinkles at the Last Supper.

They were young adult rebels with a cause.

where my punk-rock apostles at

(via second-chain)

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pandulce11:

epicallyfunny:

You can easily find all these ice cube trays atmost20.com/IceCubes

I want this because of reasons

(via starkid-who-lokid-hogwarts)

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